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STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT, Fall 2010

November 13, 2010 News, Vol.4 No.2, 2010 Global Connections 1 Comment

FORESTRY STUDENTS REVIVE VEISHEA TRADITION, FRIENDLY RIVALRY

As part of Veishea 2010 festivities, forestry students revived a tradition from the 1960s by facing off against civil engineering students in a tug-of-war competition. The forestry students were victorious and were presented with the coveted double-bit axe trophy that also dates back to the early years of this event. Faculty speculate the tug-of-war tradition may have grown out of the friendly rivalry between forestry and civil engineering students within a surveying course that was required for both disciplines; no one is sure why the tradition was suspended. Current forestry club members challenged the student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers after they came across the double-bit axe cleaning a storeroom. The civil engineers were eager to take up the challenge. Read more and see more photos.

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BORLAUG LEGACY LIVES ON THROUGH INTERNSHIP

Mary Foell, senior in public service and administration in agriculture, spent her summer creating a curriculum that teaches Norman Borlaug’s legacy. Foell is the Borlaug Scholar Award and Internship recipient, made possible by the college and the ISU Agricultural Endowment. Read more.

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TEAMS BRING HOME BIG HONORS

- Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, best student branch, first place Fountain Wars Competition, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers

- Ag Business Club, Outstanding Chapter Award and Creative Club Award, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association

- National Agri-Marketing Association, John Deere Signature Award for overall chapter involvement, second place Outstanding Chapter, fourth place National Agri-Marketing Association Student Marketing Competition

- Crops Team, second place National North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture Conference

- Horse Judging Team, third place, National Reining Breeders Classic

- Soils Team, third place team judging, National Collegiate Soils Contest

- Livestock Judging Team, high team overall, high team reasons, high team in cattle, Northern Lights Contest

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DAIRY SCIENCE CLUB HONORED FOR SERVICE TO STORY COUNTY

The Dairy Science Club was honored for their work with Food at First in Ames with a Story County Youth Volunteer Award. Club members served a meal and made a financial contribution each month. “They are energetic young people who want to make a difference in the lives of those who cannot make ends meet … or the family who is employed but still cannot meet the everyday expenses that so many others take for granted. This is a true example of ISU students doing positive things with and for the community,” wrote their nominator.

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ADVENTURES WITH BELUGAS, POLAR BEARS AND MORE

Interacting with beluga whales, polar bears, manatees and dolphins was part of the summer’s daily routine for Paul Fenton and Breanna King, both juniors in biology who spent the summer as camp counselors for the Adventure Camps at SeaWorld in Orlando. Read more.

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HAVING A BLAST TRANSPLANTING RICE IN TAIWAN

“I never imagined that I’d be up to my calves in mud, drenched in sweat, transplanting rice and having a blast doing it. I learned far more than I could’ve imagined, experienced things I’d never even heard of and met some incredible people from around the globe.” Scott Henry, a junior in agricultural business, about his experience in the Exploring Agriculture in Taiwan program. Read more.

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  1. Fred O. Walk says:

    I began my college life at Iowa State as a Forestry student in 1956, graduating in 1961. In the Spring, I think during VEISHEA,, I participated with other Forestry Club members in an annual tug-of-war with Civil Engineering students. The event was held in Central Campus, north of the Campanile. I don’t know when the tradition started but, we competed every year I was at Iowa State. I believe the current faculty is correct regarding the surveying course, which the Engineering Department put together just for Forestry students. Also, Forestry students were required to take an Engineering Problems course with special classes set up mostly for Forestry students. It was a one-quarter course in the use of a slide rule. Most of us were not enthused about the course or abuse we took from the Engineering students over their “slip stick.”

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